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What to do if a cat gets stung by a bee?

As a cat owner it is important to ask yourself if you know what to do if your cat swallows or gets stung by a bee. Will you be prepared if this happens while on a family camping trip, or in the wee hours of the morning? Cats and bee stings can result in a serious situation depending on how many times your cat got stung and on what part of your cat’s body. Cats are curious animal, so when they get stung by bees it’s usually on the face, nose, or paw. The old adage, “curiosity killed the cat”, actually has an element of truth. Cats are nosy creatures, sniffing at anything of interest. Since felines find insects interesting, they sniff at them, and if they stick their nose where it doesn’t belong, that could turn out to be fatal. So, let’s take a comprehensive look at what happens if a cat got stung by a bee. Cats and bees Since their bodies are small, a bee sting can have a greater, faster effect on cats than it does on humans . Cats react to bee stings a lot like people do. You can expe

Are lilacs poisonous to cats?

Many common, beautiful houseplants contain cat poisons that can cause serious harm, and even death.

Your cat will be curious about anything new placed in his environment. He will sniff the new thing, maybe lick it. Cats are notorious for noshing on houseplants.

Lilacs: The lilac is a very popular ornamental plant in gardens and parks, because of its attractive, sweet-smelling flowers, which appear in early summer just before many of the roses and other summer flowers come into bloom. When you think about lilacs, the first thing that comes to mind is their sweet fragrance. As beautiful as its flowers are, the fragrance is the most cherished attribute.

Are lilacs poisonous to cats?  Though lilac (common lilac) is not mentioned on the list of poisonous plants for cats in American society for the Prevention of animal Cruelty(ASPCA). Some types of lilacs are poisonous to cats. Though Lilacs are not deadly, but they might have toxic enough to make your cat mildly sick.

If the Plant is not listed don’t assume it is not poisonous.

You may check the full list here: https://www.aspca.org/pet-care/animal-poison-control/cats-plant-list. 

According to Colorado State University Website, French lilac and Persian lilac are considered poisonous.

French Lilac:  also called Goats Rue, professor weed

Toxicology principle: Toxicity is due to galegin, which is neurotoxic and hypotensive. Massive pulmonary edema, hydrothorax, and fluid accumulation in other tissues causes acute death. As little as 0.2% body weight of the dried plant is lethal to sheep. Animals either die acutely or they seem to adapt to the plant and can eat increasing amounts of the plant.

Persian Lilac: also called China berry, Persian lilac, white cedar, Texas umbrella tree.

Toxicology principle: Melia toxins A & B (tetranortriterepenes)are present in the seeds and bark, minimally in the leaves. These compounds can cause muscle contractions, tremors, collapse and death when ingested in large quantity. At lower doses, salivation, vomiting, colic and diarrhea are more likely.

(Different types of Lilacs mentioned in last section of post)

Symptoms to look for after cat consumes any part of lilac or other poisoning plant


A change in cat behavior is often the first sign that something is wrong.

Once a cat ingests or comes in contact with a toxin, symptoms may not show up right away.

Some toxins may take 3 to 4 days to show any effects.

If your cat begins to display any odd symptoms, she should be taken to the vet immediately.

Some poisons will have immediate effects upon swallowing; others may take several days to manifest symptoms. There is no one set of symptoms that will indicate a cat has been poisoned. Rather, poisoning is usually just one of many possible causes for symptoms a cat may have.

Watch out for below symptoms if your cat has already consumed some part of Lilac or Plant.

  • Drooling, vomiting, loss of appetite, diarrhea

  • Difficulty walking or a staggering walk

  • lethargy or an overall sluggishness

  • Pale or yellowish gums

  • Excessive thirst or urination

  • Nervousness or hyperactivity

  • seizure or difficulty breathing


If your cat begins to display any odd symptoms, she should be taken to the vet immediately.

Having pet insurance for your cat can help to reduce some of the costs associated with emergency vet visits.

What should you do if your cat is sick after eating one of poisonous plants?


Once the symptoms of Poisoning have been observed, you need to notify your veterinarian. Your pet has the best chance of survival if you get help immediately.

Keep your pet calm.

  1. If the cat is comatose or convulsing, wrap it in a blanket and transport him or her immediately to the veterinarian with the suspect poison container, plant, or leaf.

  2. Call the pet poison control hotline for further instructions: ASPCA Pet Poison Control (888) 426-4435. (There is a charge for this service).

  3. Never give your pet any medications to stop the vomiting or diarrhea without speaking to your veterinarian first. It is not always appropriate to try to prevent vomiting. The vomiting may actually be helping your pet get rid of the toxic substance.


More about Lilac


Though lilacs are commonly associated with gardens in the eastern United States, their requirement for excellent drainage in a neutral to slightly alkaline soil makes them especially appropriate candidates for many gardens in the western part of the country too.

Common lilac (Syringa vulgaris) – For most people, this lilac is the most familiar. The flowers are lilac-colored and have a strong fragrance. Common lilac grows to a height of about 20 feet.

Persian lilacs (Syringa x persica) are smaller than common lilacs (S. vulgaris) and generally achieve a maximum size of 8 feet tall and wide. This variety grows 10 feet tall. The flowers are pale lilac in color, and about half the diameter of common lilacs. Heat-tolerant Persian lilacs expand the lilac-growing range, thriving not only wherever common lilacs have adapted but also in warmer climes.

French lilac appears in the Conservatory Garden for a few weeks each spring and summer. If the weather is very dry, they will perhaps bloom for longer. Lilacs may bloom in white, blue, pink, or purple - in the Conservatory Garden they are usually a deep, rich purple

In the 19th century, many people planted a lilac, with its fragrant flower clusters in traditional lilac blue, below a window of their house so that they could breathe in the scent.

Common poisonous plants for Cats


Cats enjoy browsing on many indoor and outdoor plants too.

Many common plants found in the house and outdoors in the garden, woods or fields can cause problems if eaten, or handled so as to cause skin and eye contact. Some can be quite irritating, while others can cause stomach distress, skin rashes, hallucinations or irregular heartbeats. It is very important to know the common and botanical names of all your plants, whether they are indoors or outside.

Many common, beautiful houseplants contain cat poisons that can cause serious harm, and even death.

Be extra cautious if you have these plants around or inside your house.

Some of common plants which are toxic to cats include

  1. Lilies (all varieties): Ingesting even small amounts of Easter lilies and related plants can cause severe kidney failure in cats.

  2. Aloe Vera

  3. Dracaena plants

  4. Autumn crocus

  5. Daffodils

  6. Tulips

  7. Sago palm: The bulbs of these plants, if ingested, may cause serious stomach problems, convulsions, and damage to the heart.

  8. Azaleas/rhododendrons: These flowering plants contain toxins that may result in vomiting, diarrhea, coma, and sometimes even death

  9. Kalanchoe

  10. Marijuana

  11. Any calcium oxalate plants — including philodendrons, Chinese evergreens, Virginia creepers, spinach, tea leaves

  12. Ivy (all forms)

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