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What to do if a cat gets stung by a bee?

As a cat owner it is important to ask yourself if you know what to do if your cat swallows or gets stung by a bee. Will you be prepared if this happens while on a family camping trip, or in the wee hours of the morning? Cats and bee stings can result in a serious situation depending on how many times your cat got stung and on what part of your cat’s body. Cats are curious animal, so when they get stung by bees it’s usually on the face, nose, or paw. The old adage, “curiosity killed the cat”, actually has an element of truth. Cats are nosy creatures, sniffing at anything of interest. Since felines find insects interesting, they sniff at them, and if they stick their nose where it doesn’t belong, that could turn out to be fatal. So, let’s take a comprehensive look at what happens if a cat got stung by a bee. Cats and bees Since their bodies are small, a bee sting can have a greater, faster effect on cats than it does on humans . Cats react to bee stings a lot like people do. You can expe

My Cat has Diabetes..Can I put her to sleep?

Pets are perceived and treated as one of the family members.

Surveys conducted over the last two decades indicate that there is an increase in number of pet owners who view their animals as a part of their family. This number is higher than 80%.

Hence It would be difficult to watch our beloved pets to suffer indefinitely with an illness like diabetes.

Some signs of diabetes include cat losing weight and drinking lots of water, lethargy and poor coat condition, hind leg weakness.

Euthanasia is for the terminally Ill who are suffering and in pain, with no chance of recovery.

Because we cannot ask our pets the degree to which they are suffering, it is natural for us to struggle for long periods of time with this emotionally painful decision. It can be incredibly difficult to have the responsibility of deciding when to perform euthanasia.

Broadly speaking, we should consider euthanasia when the pet’s bad days outnumber their good days. Diabetes in cats is not the end unless it isn't treated. Cats can live long and healthy lives. Just as in people, diabetes in cats can be effectively controlled by the injection of insulin. A regular routine, including not only the insulin injections but also feeding and weight control can help your cat is recovering from diabetes and leading a good quality life.

Some of the questions which might come to our mind are

  1. My cat has diabetes and what should I do now? What are my options and what will happen if I do nothing? When you find out that your cat is a diabetic it can be a daunting experience. There is a lot to learn in the first few weeks. However, in time, many owners establish a routine that becomes second nature to both them and their cats. Looking after a diabetic cat is a challenging, yet rewarding undertaking.

  2. How long can a cat live with diabetes untreated? How will the disease progress? With proper care and treatment, diabetes can be controlled. Uncontrolled diabetes will eventually end in death.

  3. The third question on our mind is usually “How expensive is it going to be to treat?” or "How much does it cost to have a cat with diabetes”.This is a valid question since most of us are not independently wealthy, and money must be considered. As per pets.webmd.com, it would cost around 20$-30$ a month on insulin, syringes and other supplies. This cost won’t be for cat’s lifelong as diabetes goes into remission.

  4.  What will my time commitment be? Time, well you do have to commit for the insulin shot and test twice a day, but often you can figure a schedule that will work. Diabetes management is a “team sport,” everyone on the team must be up for the task. It requires a lifelong, daily commitment, but it’s something that can be done.


Can Cat’s Diabetes be reversed?


Underlying cause of the diabetes cannot be cured, but with regular routine, use of insulin and proper diet your cat can lead a happy and good quality life.

Remission of diabetes is defined as a situation in which clinical signs of diabetes disappear, blood glucose concentration normalizes and insulin treatment can be discontinued (insulin administration can be withdrawn for at least 4 consecutive weeks).

Remission is possible when the disease is effectively treated with a combination of diet and insulin.

As per study conducted- Age, body weight, cholesterol, and glucose levels are the factors which affect remission.

Below were the findings from the study conducted

  • In Study it was shown that Older cats developing diabetes may have a better outcome, possibly suggesting a slower disease progression.

  • Remission was more likely with higher age.

  • Remission was longer with higher body weight and shorter with higher blood glucose.


Remission of diabetes in cats is associated as much, or more, with the introduction of a low-carbohydrate, high-protein diet than with an insulin.

Study here shows an 8-year-old male neutered Persian cat with a 7-month history of diabetes mellitus (DM) goes into remission after trilostane treatment.

Although many cats that enter remission do so within 16 weeks of initiating insulin treatment, remission has been reported to occur as long as 30 months after diagnosis and initiation of insulin therapy.

How to care for Diabetic cat


Diet, Insulin and Monitoring


Diabetic cats should be fed a high-protein, low-carbohydrate diet to stabilize blood sugar, maximize metabolic rate, improve satiety, and prevent lean muscle mass loss. Your veterinarian can help choose an appropriate diet for your diabetic cat.

In addition, feeding portioned meals is ideal when managing diabetic cats because it is easier to monitor appetite and schedule insulin administration to correspond with meal times.

A diet that is also high in fiber would likely be beneficial.

Your cat has the best chance of remission if you achieve blood glucose control within six months of diagnosis, carefully monitor your cat at home, stop any medications that could interfere with the insulin, and use an appropriate insulin in combination with a high-protein, low carbohydrate diet.

More recently, you can monitor your cats blood glucose level at home.

This study reports that Intensive blood glucose control is safe and effective in diabetic cats using home monitoring and treatment with glargine.

Working together with your veterinarian to develop an insulin therapy regimen, set home monitoring parameters, and establish a regular recheck schedule is critically important.

The ability to perform home monitoring of diabetic cats is becoming more and more popular as it has multiple advantages for the patient, the owners and the veterinary surgeon.

In most cases, performing home monitoring of diabetic cats will result in improved quality of life for the cat, early detection of hypoglycemia, will reduce travel & stress associated with veterinary visits and reduction in veterinary costs.

Factors to consider before putting your cat to sleep


Here are some of the best pieces of advice I’ve heard.

Every pet, illness and situation is different. There is no single rule that can be followed for when it is time to help your best friend. Getting input from your veterinarian on the specific medical conditions that your loved one may face is vital for doing what is best for your pet.

Remember that pets live in the moment.One of the best things about animals is that they live in present. Limited ability to recall previous events and imagine future ones protect animals from the worry and associated emotional disorders that contribute so much to human suffering.

Ask yourself important questions. 

Sometimes, articulating or writing down your thoughts can make the right path more apparent. Some questions that help pet owners struggling with this decision include:

  1. What is the most important thing when considering my pet’s end-of-life treatment?

  2. What are my thoughts about euthanasia?

  3. The veterinary team recommends euthanasia?

  4. Write a concrete list of three to five things your pet likes to do. When your pet is no longer able to enjoy

  5. these things, it may be time to discuss euthanasia

  6. Is your cat feeling the pain?


Measure their quality of life. You can use tool or questionnaire to assess quality of Life for Your Companion Animal and Making End-of-  Life Decisions. You may check one here - FelineQualityofLifeScale.pdf

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